The Telltale – February 2022

THE wake-up call

As Dr. Frankenstein is reputed to have said, “It’s ALIVE!  It’s ALIVE!  Well, yes, the Port Oliver Yacht Club really is still alive.  It just needs a couple of dope slaps to get it moving.  The Club looks rather good; the docks are floating; and the Lake level is up above summer pool.  The docks are not secured to the land, so don’t put your boats on the docks quite yet.  Wait for the Dock Master, Greg Glass, to give the signal.   Besides, the water is still rather cold.  And there is a large raft of logs and trash blocking the end of the ramp.  Which brings up the first installment of Coming Attractions.  

ATTRACTIONS COMING SOON

On Saturday, March 12, from 9:00 until 12:00, we will have a clean-up of the Club Property.  Other than the mess at the end of the ramp, there are leaves to be picked up and other house-keeping tasks to be completed.  At 12:00 we will have a potluck meal.  Please bring food to share.  After the meal, there will be our first meeting of the year. 

NAUGHTY CAL LANGUAGE

Founder: “Founder” is an unusual word in that it has many different, unconnected meanings.  Of course, we have the five “founders” of our Club, Bud Burford (father of John), Joe Mayfield, Don Mayfield, Paul Huddleston (father of Joe, Phil, and Lee), and Joe Huddleston (brother of Phil and Lee).  There is “founder” which means melting and casing metal.  There is “founder” which is to disable an animal, especially a horse, by overfeeding it.  But the “founder” that I am interested in is the nautical context, where founder means to submerge or sink.  This species of founder comes from the Latin fundus which means the bottom or base.  So, a sinking boat is expected to end up on the fundus. 

Apophenia:  The human tendency to link unrelated things.  (For example, including this term in a sailing club newsletter.)  😊

Duning-Kruger Effect:  People who know the least about something often seem confident that they know more than everyone else.  (Now my bet is that you think that term is apropos to a sailing club. 😊)  

Weatherly:  The ability of a sailboat to sail close to the wind with little leeway.  A modern racing boat can sometimes point almost to 30° off the wind.   Most cruisers do well to sail to 40° or 50° off the wind.  Viking ships and square-rigged boats struggled to sail 70° off the wind.  Whereas clipper ships could sail up to 65° off the wind.  That may not seem like much of a difference, but consider that they were traveling very long distances. A small advantage added up to a big difference.    

COOL WEATHER  SAILING

The air will soon feel warm, except for a few cold snaps such as “Dogwood Winter,” “Blackberry Winter,” and “Linen Britches.”  But, the water will remain cold for several more months.  The point is, if you get your boat in soon, please keep the temperature of the water in mind.  First-of-all, launching your boat is going to be a “bracing” experience.  Give some thought to how you might be able to launch without getting wet.  It can be done with a little forethought.  

As you go out onto the Lake, please wear a Personal Floatation Devise (PFD), that is, a life jacket to those of us who have been around a while.  Of course, it would be prudent to wear your PDF even in the summer, but in the early spring it can be more than just handy.  A warm body falling into a cold lake can practically paralyze the person’s muscles.  Climbing back into a boat or righting a capsized boat may be easy in the summer but nearly impossible in the spring.   And, even if it does not save your life, it will make it easier for us to locate and thaw out your body. 

For those days when the air is cool, remember that cool air is denser.  So, a brisk wind which would be wonderful in the summer may be harder for your boat to handle in the spring, same wind speed but much more power.  Adding to that, the winds in the spring tend to be stronger.

So, do not dilly-dally,   Get your boat ready enough and go sailing.  The Lake is calling you.

HEAVY WEATHER SAILING

The first order of business is the selection of sails.  Reconsider flying that 155% genoa.  I know that it is beautiful and makes your heart leap up, but it can easily overpower your boat.  Save it for the summer doldrums.  

If you can reef your main sail, think about doing so before you go out.  When there is a nice gentle breeze in the Cove, look out at the main body of the Lake.  If you think that you are looking at a herd of wild, white stallions, think again.  They are whitecaps that appear when the wind reaches 12 to 13 knots.  A prudent sailor will put at least one reef in her main before going out.  When she gets out on the Lake and discovers that the wind is within her capabilities, she can always shake out the reef.   You will find that it is a lot easier and safer to put in a reef while you are sheltered and shake it out later than to go out and get beaten up by strong wind while you try to put in a reef. 

If you are getting healed over too much for your comfort or even rounding up, you need to adjust your center of lateral resistance relative to your center of effort.   Say what?   Your center of lateral resistance is your centerboard or keel.  Your center of effort is the combination of your sails.  

Most people think that the only purpose of the centerboard line is to raise or lower your board according to the depth of the water.  But they are missing out on a very useful tool.  Most centerboards are attached at their forward end.  When they are lowered, they pivot on that forward attachment until they are essentially vertical.  But there are a lot of positions between vertical and horizontal.  If your board is all the way down and your boat is healing more than your like, you are probably “tripping over your board,” in other words, the wind is trying to push you sideways and the centerboard is pushing against the water to resist.  The push of the sails is above the resistance of the board so the sideways push tends to heal the boat over.  When you first pull on the centerboard line it does not lift the board straight up.  It starts the board pivoting on that forward attachment.  The first few inches of the line raise the board very little.  What those first few inches of line do is move the board aft.   When you do this, you will be moving the center of resistance of the board under the main sail.   The boat will not round up or heal as much.

For boats with fin keels, of course you cannot raise the keel.  But you can move the keel slightly farther aft my moving weight forward.  If the bow is down and the stern is up, the center of resistance will have been moved aft to some extent.

One more line with which you need to become familiar was invented by a distant relative of our Member, Tom Cunningham.  It is called a cunningham after Briggs Cunningham.  It is a line that runs through a grommet in the luff of a mainsail about a foot above the gooseneck (where the boom attaches to the mast).  If you have reefing on your boat, the first reef point grommet is probably a few inches farther up the luff.  The cunningham is used to tighten the luff by pulling down on it.  

You may ask, “Why not just lower the boom or raise the sail higher?”  A very reasonable question.  Raising the sail higher or lowering the boom does tighten the luff, but it also affects the whole sail in ways you might not want.  Another good reason is that most racing boats have black lines around the ends of their masts and booms to prevent a sailor from using a larger sail or stretching her sail larger.  Take a look at your own boat.   Now you don’t have to wonder what those black bands are for.  By using a cunningham, a sailor can tighter her luff without going over those black lines.  

So why would you want to tighten your luff?  The topic of this article should give you a clue, heavy weather sailing.  When you are sailing you want the deepest draft of your mainsail to be as close as you can get it to your mast.  As you know, the wind moving over that bulge is what creates the lower air pressure, which in turn, moves your boat.  But without a cunningham, as the wind increases in strength, the bulge tends to move aft.  Normally the lower air pressure at the front part of the bulge pulls the boat forward.   As the bulge moves aft, the lower air pressure will pull less forward and more to the side, slowing the boat down and making it heal more.

If you do not have a cunningham grommet in your mainsail and you want to add one, please note that the grommet has to be embedded in a lot of extra pieces of sail cloth to keep it from ripping the sail.   

Lee Huddleston, Scribe

NoName Regatta and June Meeting – Saturday June 13th

Saturday Race!. Race time will start at about noon. If we have enough participation, and or desire, the race will carry on to Sunday. The race will be no charge, and there will be no prizes. We ask only that anyone participating to please bring a side for the potluck dinner/ meeting. We will welcome of course all members, and any non members who wish to attend. We will also do our best to allow for social distancing to accommodate anyone who is concerned.

Officers February Meeting Notes

We met on Saturday February 22nd at Gary Reimer’s Crows Nest.

  • The board is looking at upgrading our Gate system to an electric system with automatic locks, this is in the early stages, but will likely happen this year.
  • We are discussing what to do with the abandoned boats in the upper yard, we would like to clean this out as much as we can. Possible to cut these up and dispose of them – Maybe use Facebook Marketplace etc.
  • We had a lot of discussion regarding the high lake levels and how to make it easier to launch under these conditions, we will purchase three 10 foot dock sections and moor them with one end on shore and the other anchored to form a courtesy dock for launching, as water goes down this can be moved to provide a gangway to the docks ( instead of using the canoe or other makeshift device). Troy moved to purchase and Gary Guss seconded. This was approved.
  • We will try to have our monthly meetings on Saturdays to coincide with the Regatta schedule. This is more efficient than the separate Friday meetings.
  • We are looking into a boat lift system, although this is still in the early stages. If you have ideas on this forward them to the officers or bring up in a meeting
  • Exploring catering for the Christmas party for the main dish at least.
  • Planned out calendar for the year – You can view this under 2020 Calendar at the top of our webpage or direct link at  https://portoliveryachtclub.com/calendar-of-events/.

That pretty much covers our discussion. Again, we are always seeking input, if you have an idea please bring it up with the officers or at a meeting. We are always looking for volunteers to cook, run races, help with operating the club etc. It’s your club! Let’s make 2020 a great year and fair winds for all.

Gary Guss – Scribe

 

 

2020 Dues are Due in January

We will not be mailing out notices this year. We will send out email reminders.

Dues for 2020 will be due during the month of January, dues paid after February 1st will have a $5 late fee attached for each month they are in arrears. This will allow us to have funds for the early part of the season, which is when we incur more expense.

Dues are $300/ year for Members with boats in the yard (additional boats are $50 each) Associates dues are $175/ year (no boat in yard). Seniors 65 or older get a 20% Discount on dues.

Here is a Link to the form, please download, print and send it in with your dues ..

POYC Membership Application

Please make checks payable to Port Oliver Yacht Club and mail them to PO Box 1472 Bowling Green, KY 42102.

Thanks for your attention.

POYC Christmas Party Dec. 7th

This year the party will be held on Saturday December 7th from 6-10pm at Christ Episcopal Church on State Street in Bowling Green. The fee will be $10 member. This year the club will provide Beer and Wine and we would like the members to bring a potluck dish (heavy hors d’oeuvres) If each couple /or member could prepare enough to serve 10 people, we should have sufficient food for all. Please RSVP on our Facebook page or contact Margaret Coverdale Webb to let us know what you are bringing. Lets try for variety, so we don’t all bring the same items.

Trashmasters Classic – September 15th!

The Friends of Barren River Lake and Park is organizing a hands-on opportunity to be good environmental stewards with the 31st annual Trashmasters Classic Lakeshore Cleanup at Barren River Lake on Sept. 15 from 8 to 11:30 a.m.

“This cleanup is important for a couple reasons – it gives the community a chance to come together and pitch in and be a part of something bigger than themselves,” said Holly Myers, Army Corps of Engineers park ranger, and “it really makes a difference in the health and welfare of the lake itself,” in addition to the surrounding wildlife and water ecosystem.

Check-in will be from 8 to 9 a.m. at various locations: Baileys Point, the Narrows, Barren River Lake State Resort Park, Port Oliver and Walnut Creek. At each station, pontoon boats will shuttle volunteers to the shoreline to pick up trash. Trash bags and gloves will be provided, but bring your own water and sunscreen.